America

Arequipa and the disturbing monastery of Santa Catalina

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Prior to travel to Peru, a friend told me that the historic center of Arequipa It was small but that its beauty invited to get lost in its streets. Well, after our passage through the white city I can not agree more.

He main point of the city is the Parade ground and from there we start our itinerary through the center. As in almost all the places of arms of Peru, Arequipa also has its Cathedral and a few streets away is the Church of the company. In the first we did not enter and in the second we paid little attention despite being of the oldest in the city. Lately I'm not a fan of visiting churches, let alone if you have to pay. What I really loved about Arequipa were his colonial houses.

I don't know why it will be, maybe because those buildings evoke the summers of my childhood in Estremadura, but when I walk through a colonial city I feel at home. The same happened to me in Merida and in Valladolid When we were traveling through Mexico.


The streets adjacent to the Plaza de Armas are very beautiful and colorful. Many of the old colonial houses have been transformed into businesses, be they banks, restaurants or hotels, but some are now museums and can be visited. Moral's house It is a museum house built in the 18th century and that is kept in very good condition. It has a central courtyard with a centenary tree and some rooms that still maintain the furniture of the time.


Then we roam the San Lázaro neighborhood, where it is worth missing a good time, and we returned to the Plaza de Armas to walk in the convent of Santo Domingo. Later, we spent almost an hour browsing in a large supermarket in the city center and we waited for it to get dark to visit the St. Catherine's Monastery.

This enclave is undoubtedly the most important in the city and for which I think it is worth making a stop in Arequipa (although this statement has accused some controversy with Xavi). The monastery of Santa Catalina is a huge convent, it looks like a walled mini-city. The history of this convent is somewhat curious: in 1580 it was founded by María de Guzmán, who dedicated herself to recruiting the nuns in a somewhat selective way. They entered more for their fortune than for their religious devotion. In fact, upon entering this closing convent they adopted a rather strange vow of chastity, since many of them had rooms with private kitchens, slaves and servants at their service.

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